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Rivers & Waterways

Rivers and Waterways

Our rivers and waterways are healthy and meet the needs of our people and land.

Our Traditional culture revolved around relationships to the land and water – relationships that hold deep physical, social, environmental, spiritual and cultural significance.

Today, the land and its waterways remain central to our cultural identity and aspirations for community and economic development. Our rivers are the veins of Country, and provide food and medicine, and places to camp, hunt, fish, swim and hold ceremonies. They are places that are central to our creation stories, and many of our cultural heritage sites are associated with waterways – burial sites, birthing sites and middens. Our waterways are places that we connect with our ancestors and pass traditional knowledge on to our children and grandchildren.

Our rivers, lakes and swamps are sick. A legacy of past and current land management decisions have caused erosion, weed and pest issues and pollution from farm chemicals and mining contaminants throughout our Country. Water diversions and controlled flows mean that many of our rivers are getting water at the wrong time, or in the wrong volumes, and over-fishing is putting pressure on important species. It is a big task to heal our waterways so that they can continue to be the lifeblood of our Country.

Rivers such as the Loddon, Coliban, Campaspe, Avoca and Avon; Lakes that include Boort, Eppalock and Laanecoorie; swamps and creeks – these are significant parts of our Country that link us to our past and will provide for our future.

We work to ensure all of our waterways are healthy, with the right water in the right place at the right time to meet the needs of the environment, Jaara people and the broader community.

Dja Dja Wurrung have a recognised and legitimate role in water governance, and expect genuine consultation in policy development and a role in decision-making about our waterways.

We work to secure adequate and equitable water rights that meet our social, cultural, spiritual, economic and environmental needs and share our creation stories to teach people of how water works in the landscape.

Dja Dja Wurrung have a recognised and legitimate role in water governance, and expect genuine consultation in policy development and a role in decision-making about our waterways.